herbal tea

Anxiety Relief Teas

Stress....Our Favorite "S" Word These Days

Have you ever wondered which herbal teas are beneficial to your stress levels? Herbal teas are an excellent alternative to chemically powered prescription medications for reducing stress and tension. For thousands of years and across different cultures, they have been used and practiced for their therapeutic and medicinal effects. Maybe it’s time you joined the club!

Whether it’s financial concerns, family obligations, meeting deadlines, or dealing with economic depression, the list is infinite, stress may attack us all, young and old at any time. Unfortunately, whether we like it or not, it has become the standard and plays a significant role in our daily lives, especially of late. Many people will turn to synthetic pharmaceuticals for a ‘quick fix,’ unaware of the long-term consequences on their bodies and minds.

Not all stress, however, is harmful. Some people work and perform better under certain stress, but if stress is prolonged, panic can set in and things can get a little out of hand! Our bodies are built to withstand, and often thrive on, small bouts of stress, but too much of it isn’t good for us. Stress has always existed and evolved over time, and the practice of blending and drinking herbal teas for this prevalent ailment is still practiced today. So, if you’re annoying your partner with your mood swings or ready to pull your hair out, maybe try one of these herbal tea mixes to reclaim your sanity and theirs.

Catnip

Yes, I get what you’re thinking, it’s for cats!!…but humans can also eat it! It’s known as the “anti-stress herb” and has been used to treat uneasiness and children who have had a horrible dream in the past. It’s even been used for insanity, not that it’s suggested you let your stress levels get so bad! It has a calming and soothing impact, and it can also be used to relieve stress and anxiety caused by nicotine or drug withdrawal. So get some growing in the herb patch and even your feline friends will thank you.

Peppermint

This plant is regarded as a “cure-all” in England, and it is listed in the Bible as one of the herbs used to pay taxes! It’s been used to cure hysteria (again not suggesting you let it get that far) and nervous illnesses, and it’s also a great way to relieve stomach pains and cramps. This one is easy to find, so pick some up on your next trip to the supermarket.

Ginseng

The moniker “king of tonics” is believed to mean “world wonder,” and the Chinese see this herb as a supreme treatment for all ailments. It is a powerful antidote to stress, and in the West, it is used to treat nervous and mental exhaustion-related loss of appetite, stomach and digestive diseases

Chamomile

Chamomile, sometimes known as the “all-around comforter,” is a natural sedative and one of the greatest herbal teas for calming and soothing frayed nerves. This is due to its anti-spasmodic characteristics, which aid in the relaxation of your body’s muscles. It is usually even safe to use with restless youngsters due to its powerful relaxing and calming properties but always check before with your doctor, midwife or care provider as things are always changing and its best to stay up to date with recommendations.

Kava Kava

Kava Kava, often known as the “mood adjuster,” works by working on the nerve centers and stimulating them to ease anxiety, tension, and emotional stress. It’s also a gentle natural sedative that can provide a sense of calm without causing any loss of attention or changes in motor reflexes.

Valerian

Valerian is known as ‘Phu’ because of its peculiar and disagreeable odour. Valerian includes compounds known as ‘valepotriates,’ which give it sedative properties. It’s also known as “nature’s tranquilliser,” a sedative and anxiety reliever administered to civilians during WWII to help them cope with the stress of continuous air attacks. It’s still a very popular herb today to aid restful sleep and calm nerves.

Passionflower

Passionflower lowered anxiety during four weeks in one well-designed study; the herbal cure was just as efficient as a common anti-anxiety prescription. It is thought to be effective in treating agitation, irritability, depression, and opiate withdrawal. It’s available as tea or as liquid extract drops.

Lavender

In a recent study, lavender oil was found to relax people and regulate numerous symptoms similar to the prescription drug Ativan on patients with generalized anxiety symptoms. It is a non-sedating essential oil that can be inhaled or given as a crushed supplement in capsule form. Even having the lavender plant in your room promotes wellbeing as it’s aroma is beautiful and calming.

Ashwaganda

This is a herbal supplement that is provided as a standardised supplement to help with anxiety symptoms. Ashwagandha has been demonstrated in several studies to reduce the stress hormone cortisol as well as anxiety-related symptoms. It has no serious side effects and can be taken for a long time. It was even found to be superior to Ativan in one study. It can be taken as a prepared tea or the powder can be added to other beverages. I personally take Ashwaganda in a gummy form on a daily basis…this is my personal favorite for stressful times!

Theanine

Both black tea and green tea include L-theanine, a water-soluble amino acid. It can be consumed as a tea or as a supplement in the form of a pill. It’s non-addictive and doesn’t have any sedative effects. It is thought to reduce anxiety and stress-related symptoms by acting directly on brain regions. Herbal medicines contain certain unique qualities that aren’t seen in benzodiazepines, which are usually used to treat anxiety. They’re all-natural vitamins that have been used for millennia with great success. They’re also non-addictive and mild on the body. Herbal tea is a safe and simple approach to maintain daily emotions of serenity. Herbal teas and the above-mentioned procedures can be utilized to  ease anxiety symptoms without causing addiction or unpleasant side effects.

Note: However as always, before you attempt them, check with your doctor to make sure they won’t interact negatively with any other medications you’re taking or that there are no contraindications for your particular situation.They are, for the most part, free of adverse effects. However, it’s vital to keep in mind that herbs can interact with sedative medicines and other medicines, so proceed cautiously and see your doctor or a herbalist before beginning.

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